Newsroom

CROW Case of the Week: Burrowing Owl (#19-3333)


The burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia)is a small owl with long legs, short tail and a rounded head that does not include ear tufts. Unlike most other owls, which are more inclined to live in trees, burrowing owls spend most of their time on the ground or on lower perches. They are so named because they live underground in burrows that they have either dug themselves or taken over from a tortoise or other keystone species. Burrowing owls also hunt close to the ground, catching insects and small animals. They do this activity during the day when they are most active, another trait that is unlike other owl species. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Laughing Gull (#19-3552)


The laughing gull (Leucophaeus atricilla) is often called a bird of summer due to its fondness of beaches and its distinct, nasalized call that one would hear if sitting on a beachfront in the northeast. The handsome gull usually sports a white underbelly to go with a light gray wing color and a dark-colored head. In winter, the color of its head becomes more grayish. The coastal bird dines on practically anything and can be found in parking lots, fields or garbage dump areas when not on the shoreline. more...

CROW Classic Golf Tournament FORE! Wildlife


The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) will host its annual CROW Classic Golf Tournament on Saturday, October 5 at The Sanctuary Golf Club on Sanibel. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Rough-Winged Swallow (#19-3519)


The northern rough-winged swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) is among many different species of swallows and like birds. This small bird with a square tail has brown upper parts and off-white under parts. While many swallows nest in colonies, northern rough-winged swallows prefer solitary burrows or unnatural crevices such as gutters, drainpipes and bridges. They are great fliers that consume insects in mid-air. Their flight wingbeats are slower than most other swallows. Northern rough-winged swallows spend winters in Mexico or Central America. They get their name due to their tiny hooks on the edges of their primary feathers, and it reportedly takes them close to 100 days to finish growing new feathers. more...

CROW’s 38th Taste of the Islands Announces Bank of the Islands/Edison National Bank as Presenting Sponsor


The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) welcomes Bank of the Islands/Edison National Bank as the returning Presenting Sponsor for the 38th Taste of the Islands. This marks the banks’ tenth year as the Presenting Sponsor of CROW’s signature event. more...