Newsroom

CROW Case of the Week: Royal Tern (#21-4876)


The royal tern (Thalasseus maximus) is a whitish bird with gray wings. It stands out with its black shaggy crown and daggerlike orange bill. This shorebird can be seen in a colony along the sandy beaches or diving for small fish in shallow waters. more...

CROW CAWs


This week's CAW | Orphaned Striped Skunk Siblings - Well known for their pungent scent, striped skunks are not just stinky but also have important environmental roles! Some fun facts about striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) include their consumption of wasps and venomous rattlesnakes. Skunks are immune to venomous snake bites and rattlesnakes often end up on the menu. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Striped Skunks (#21-4744 & #21-4745)


The striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) is a medium-sized mammal with a glossy black coat, a thin, white stripe between its eyes and two stripes on its back. Skunk babies are blind and deaf when they are born. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Wood Stork (#21-4617)


The wood stork (Mycteria americana) is a large black-and-white waterbird with long legs and black flight feathers. It breeds in Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas, while non-breeding wood storks can be found throughout North America and into northern Argentina. While they are often the same size, wood storks differ from herons by the size of their bills (thicker) and shape of their bills (more curved than herons). A wood stork also has a featherless neck and head, with gray rough, scaly skin covering that area. more...

CROW Case of the Week: Chuck-will's-widow (#21-4591)


The Chuck-will’s-widow (Antrostomus carolinensis) is a nocturnal bird from the nightjar family, which can be characterized by long wings, short legs and tiny bills. It is an extremely well-camouflaged bird due to its brown coloring and dark patterned feathers. It naturally likes to sit on roadsides at night and can be spotted in headlights where its eyes appear to glow. more...